Can A Multilateral Security Organization, Modeled on NATO, Be Established in Northeast Asia?

NATO has always been a collective defence organization, aimed at repelling an external threat to Alliance members. However, ever since the Harmel Report of 1967, and certainly since the end of the Cold War, NATO’s purview has widened to include a much more prominent diplomatic role, related to a much broader understanding of what constitutes a security concern, without compromising its original mission. Changsung Lee considers whether this latter-day understanding of NATO’s purpose might serve as a template for a future multilateral security structure in Northeast Asia that could facilitate a rules-based order in that region, and perhaps help catalyze the reunification of the Korean Peninsula.

Egypt Is Becoming Central to NATO-Area Geo-Economics

The Arab Spring threw a wrench into Egypt’s promising liquified natural gas (LNG) industry. Now, with stability returned to that country and the discovery of new gas deposits in the Nile littoral, Egypt is poised to become a major source of energy to the E.U. market. As auspicious as this sounds, it raises the stakes in an already volatile region marked by militarization and beset by inter-state strife and transcontinental tension.

Russia, Cyber-warfare and Canada’s Democracy

In today’s day and age, the battlefields of war and the boundaries of conflict have changed significantly. Conflict can manifest in various forms – hot wars, cold wars, trade wars, and most recently cyberwar. Digital attacks have the capacity to cripple a states infrastructure from thousands of kilometers away. The internet has become a new […]